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Tba / Annulé

maxe008

Each mp3 track
(320 kbits) 0.99 €

01_Beba Plays


02_I


03_B>Lan


04_Tuesd


05_Hip


06_Dread


07_Cheg


08_Sleepwalkers


09_Zinavs


10_Smashed


11_Soshi


12_Okean K


13_Signdunst


14_Annulé


15_Getgoin


16_Nevermind


17_Walk


18_Tbc Geo Doc.


19_Downby


20_Lego Poetry


21_Airports


22_Urs


Tba / Annulé

Max.Ernst - maxe008

Choose Product
• CD / 13 €

"TBA aka Tusia Beridze 25 year old female music producer from Tbilisi / Georgia (also known as a member of Goslab, a Georgian art laboratory, where she contributed with her video works) returns with her second album on max.Ernst. Not until two years before she started producing music on her own has she had a straight connection to it, because her academic education in political and media sciences at American Institutes went in radically different direction from art and music. But it constantly appeared to be a strong challenging surrounding around her, starting from her family, ending with friends and people she worked with, such as Nika Machaidze aka Nikakoi, (wmf rec.) Erast ( Laboratory instinct) and Gogi Dzodzuashvili (aka Post Industrial Boys), who used Tusias' vocals and lyrics in most of their songs. Tusia grew up within a space, which is something like an erratic mixture of controversial and at the same time logical record, which is a mixed Georgian, Russian and European production. It initiated in childhood under the tunes of The Smiths, Lou Reed, Weather Report, David Bowie, Cocteau Twins, Bjork, Aphex Twin, Squarepusher, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Jeff Mills, Autechre, Kraftwerk, Georgian folk music and much more, which came out transformed from the rough speakers of Soviet production in the tiny studio space of Goslab, which appeared to be a shelter and a medium for translating brutal external reality into the means to survive within it. This was the soundtrack of the political and social transformations in Georgia. From Georgian monarchs to Russian ones, from the collapse of Soviet colonial blockade to the undermined democracy, independence in poverty and finally to 'satin revolution' of the transmitting forcelines."

 

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